Biological Sciences

Activity patterns of bat species at interstate highway sites with and without wildlife underpasses

Author(s) Jenna Chapman Faculty Mentor(s) Kristina Ernest (Biological Sciences) Abstract Roads destroy, degrade, and isolate wildlife habitats. Despite the ecological importance of bats and the effect roads have on bats’ access to foraging, breeding, and roosting habitat, relatively few studies have investigated whether wildlife crossing… Read More »Activity patterns of bat species at interstate highway sites with and without wildlife underpasses

Remeasurement of the Health of Whitebark Pine Stands in the Central Washington Cascades

Author(s) Nancy Parra Faculty Mentor(s) Alison Scoville (Biological Sciences) Abstract Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) plays a vital role in colonizing newly disturbed area, providing shade for other tree species to colonize, and supplying food for a variety of birds and mammals, such as Clark’s nutcrackers… Read More »Remeasurement of the Health of Whitebark Pine Stands in the Central Washington Cascades

Bridged lactam-lactones and amino lactones are active in vitro against Leishmania major, the causative agent of human cutaneous

Author(s) Cameron Smith Faculty Mentor(s) Blaise Dondji (Biological Sciences) Abstract Leishmania are protozoan parasites and causative agents of leishmaniasis, utilizing female sandflies (a blood sucking parasite) as their vector for transmission. A bite from an infected female sand-fly to vertebrates (notably humans, rodents, canines) is… Read More »Bridged lactam-lactones and amino lactones are active in vitro against Leishmania major, the causative agent of human cutaneous

Evaluation of Synthesized Organic Compounds as Potential Therapeutics for Human Leishmaniasis

Author(s) Hunter Korf Faculty Mentor(s) Blaise Dondji (Biological Sciences) Abstract Leishmaniasis is a disease caused by the parasitic protozoan Leishmania. The disease is present in 88 countries, with 350 million people at risk and 12 million patients. There are three main clinical types of the… Read More »Evaluation of Synthesized Organic Compounds as Potential Therapeutics for Human Leishmaniasis

Lichen Coverage on North- and South-Facing Slopes in Central Washington

Author(s) Ben Keller, Molly Robertson, Justin Nickolaus Faculty Mentor(s) Lisa Ely (Other), Dan Beck (Biology) Abstract Ben Keller SOURCE Abstract 4/6/2021 Lichen Coverage on North- and South-Facing Slopes in Central Washington Lichen are symbiotic organisms that live on trees, rocks and other surfaces. For our… Read More »Lichen Coverage on North- and South-Facing Slopes in Central Washington

Investigating the Effects of Sambucus nigra on the Adaptive Immune Response In Vivo

Author(s) Paul Messier, Daniella Mendez Paddila Faculty Mentor(s) Gabrielle Stryker (Biological Sciences) Abstract Elderberry extracts, obtained from the berries of the plant Sambucus nigra, are marketed as an immune stimulant and are widely available. Previous research has suggested that bioactive components of elderberry extract exhibit… Read More »Investigating the Effects of Sambucus nigra on the Adaptive Immune Response In Vivo

Prevalence of Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever in Kittitas County Ticks

Author(s) Raeanne Tegman Faculty Mentor(s) Gabrielle Stryker (Biological Sciences) Abstract Rickettsia rickettsii is a pathogenic bacterium that causes Rocky Mountain spotted fever in individuals who have been the recipient of a tick bite. Rocky Mountain spotted fever causes fever, headache, rashes, and can be deadly… Read More »Prevalence of Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever in Kittitas County Ticks

“I see you; you see me”: How a crocodile sanctuary can teach us to create a more sustainable future with our cohabitants.

Author(s) Mackenzie Stinson Faculty Mentor(s) Daniel Beck (Biological Sciences), Rodrigo Tenteria-Valencia Abstract Mexico is a diverse and wonderful place for cultures, biospheres, and organisms. Along the Costalegre region of Jalisco there is a vast expanse of habitat called the Chamela-Cuixmala Reserve. Located just south of… Read More »“I see you; you see me”: How a crocodile sanctuary can teach us to create a more sustainable future with our cohabitants.