Maternal Depression Perceived During Adolescence and Attachment Security in Adulthood

Author(s)

Adrienne Larson

Faculty Mentor(s)

Amy Claridge (Family & Consumer Sciences)

Abstract

Previous literature has found that maternal depression and adversity can decrease the likelihood of the formation of a secure attachment in infants, but few studies have examined the association between maternal depression during adolescence and how it relates to adult attachment security. The purpose of this study was to examine if the perception of maternal depression during adolescence is related to adult attachment security. The current study examined the relationships between perception of maternal depression during adolescence, adult attachment security, and secondary caregiver involvement during adolescence among adults (N = 180) by implementing quantitative survey methods. The results indicated that maternal depression perceived during adolescence was associated with adult attachment security, and that secondary caregiver involvement during adolescence was not a statistically significant moderator. Findings suggest there is a need for more research examining the relationship between maternal depression perceived during later childhood and adult attachment security.

Keywords: Attachment security, Maternal depression, Adults

Presentation

2 thoughts on “Maternal Depression Perceived During Adolescence and Attachment Security in Adulthood”

  1. Fantastic presentation and research! This is a super interesting but difficult topic that I definitely think needs to be addressed. You provided adequate references and explained your research well! What are your hopes for this research moving forward?

  2. Hi Adrienne,
    This has been one of my favorite SOURCE presentations! There is some cross-over with our research in public health about maternal health, so it was really interesting to see your findings. I am curious to hear your thoughts about age being a modifier for perceived maternal depression. I certainly agree that memory due to age is a likely factor, but do you think this could also indicate rising rates of maternal depression from one generation to the next? Thank you for investigating this topic!

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