Complex Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder and Communication

Author(s)

Nicole Boyer

Faculty Mentor(s)

Nicole Dunn (Interdisciplinary Studies – Social Sciences), Mark Soelling (Psychology), Amy McCoy (Psychology)

Abstract

As with the basis of cognitive behavioral therapy, it is recognized that the behaviors of the individual are reflection of the individual’s thought processes. For the purpose of this essay, this fact should be pointed out as it translates also to the overt behaviors of an individual with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), Complex-PTSD (C-PTSD), or a history of domestic violence (DV). Abnormal, inappropriate affect and behaviors of the like can and should be attributed to the extensive number of traumatic experiences incurred by these individuals throughout the course of their lifetimes. The purpose of this essay is to examine some of these seemingly antisocial behaviors, what longitudinal effects those behaviors may have for the individual, the cognitive processes behind those behaviors, as well as how to challenge some of those behaviors and processes within the individual. The traumatized self will often, unwittingly, set the stage for the recurrence of trauma because of their lack of social and coping skills, their presentation of subjectively frail self-concept, and extreme defense mechanisms. Advocated herein will be the need for creating new treatment methods and models for skill building groups, individual work, and family systems therapy to address these deficits in social functioning. Such communication based skill building is likely to induce psychological healing from past trauma and have a significant impact upon the phenomena of recurrence.

Keywords: Trauma, Communication, neurobiology

Presentation

3 thoughts on “Complex Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder and Communication”

  1. I spent 1-1/2 years putting work into this. I neglected the neurobiology section, but as I see it, the mylenation of trauma associated neurons runs in a positive feedback loop: flight or fight->more mylen->increased conduction-> the easier it is to have a gut reaction and with it, more mylenation.

  2. Very interesting and informative poster presentation! Can you give me a non-obvious example of what lacking boundaries in a casual conversation (like at the grocery store) looks like?

    1. Hello Kylie!
      Very interesting and informative poster presentation! Can you give me a non-obvious example of what lacking boundaries in a casual conversation (like at the grocery store) looks like?

      One non-obvious example is putting yourself on the inferior side of the communication transaction with the cashier:
      So, you are fumbling with your change or your card or something and you ~explain yourself~ while you are fumbling/figuring it out. Right there you make yourself the subordinate. They can see what’s happening, and really there is no need to forgive, right? This is an indicator of having no boundaries ~and just giving them away.
      *Overly explaining yourself is servile and subordinate.
      *Being servile reflects always looking for acceptance and feelings of insecurity
      These reflect emotional vulnerability.
      Thank you for posting a question:)
      -Nicole M. Boyer

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